Who Claims the Children as Dependents for Tax Purposes?

About this time of year, separated parents sometimes ask us who can claim the children on their taxes.  Many parents simply agree that the parent that would get the most benefit can claim the children.  Other parents have provisions in their orders directing the parties to claim or not to claim the children on their taxes.  But what about when there is no agreement?

The position the IRS takes is that the person having the children more than half the year can claim the children.  IRS Publication 504.

This means that the custodial parent, or the parent the children live with primarily, can claim the exemption.

So what happens if your orders say that one parent gets to claim the children and the other parent files first, claiming the children?  Realistically, the parent that should have been able to claim the children is going to have a hard time.  They will need to work with the IRS, the other party, and possibly an attorney well-versed in tax law to correct the issue.  The parent could also file an enforcement action or sue for the lost benefit.  The easiest way to avoid the issue?  Speak with the other parent, or make sure you file first.

HEALTH REIMBURSEMENT: DON’T FORGET TO SUBMIT YOUR RECEIPTS!

This is a guest post from Attorney Kevin Segler, also at Holmes, Diggs & Eames.  Thank you, Kevin, for the article!

THE ISSUE:

If the party who incurs an unreimbursed health care expense for a child fails to submit the bill/receipt to the other party for reimbursement within the time period specified in the order, is the other party still required to reimburse for those health care expenses for which they received untimely notice?

HYPOTHETICAL SCENARIO:

Mother and Father have one child and their Order in Suit Affecting the Parent-Child Relationship contains standard language regarding payment of unreimbursed health care expenses. The Order provides that “each party must pay 50 percent of the unreimbursed health care expenses. The party who incurs a health care expense on behalf of a child must submit to the other party all forms, receipts, bills, statements, and explanations of benefits reflecting the uninsured portion of the health care expenses within thirty (30) days after he or she receives them.”

The child is 15 at the time of the order. Five years later, Mother sends Father various bills and receipts for the child’s health care expenses she incurred when the child was 16. Father does not pay. A year after sending Father the bills, Mother files a Motion for Enforcement for a cumulative money judgment based on Father’s nonpayment of his 50% of the unreimbursed health care expenses for the child. Is Father still obligated to pay his 50% even though Mother did not submit the bills and receipts to him within 30 days after she received them?

Short Answer: It seems to be in the discretion of the trial court judge whether Father is obligated to pay.

THE STATUTE:

The Texas Family Code §154.183(c)(1)-(2) states:

(c) As additional child support, the court shall allocate between the parties, according to their circumstances:

  1. The reasonable and necessary health care expenses, including vision and dental expenses, of the child that are not reimbursed by health insurance or are not otherwise covered by the amount of cash medical support ordered under Section 154.182(b)(3); and

  2. Amounts paid by either party as deductibles or copayments in obtaining health care services for the child covered under a health insurance policy.”

Remember, obligations under this section are considered child support and are treated the same as periodic child support payments in that the penalties and limitations periods are the same for enforcement purposes.

THE CASE LAW:

While there are no Texas Supreme Court opinions on this issue, several appellate courts have addressed the topic.

In re A.C.B., 302 S.W.3d 560 (Tex.App.—Amarillo 2009, no pet.)

In 2009, the Amarillo Court of Appeals upheld a trial court ruling that allowed reimbursement for bills despite one party missing the deadline to submit receipts. The order in A.C.B. gave the paying party a ten-day window to provide bills/receipts to the other party. Mother testified that she provided one bill to father within the ten-day window required by the order but there were several bills that were not presented by the deadline.

Even though mother failed to provide the majority of the bills and receipts to father within the ten-day notice period provided in the order, the appellate court held that the trial court did not abuse its discretion in awarding mother 50 percent of unreimbursed medical expenses. The court reasoned that even if mother failed to provide copies of the medical bills within the ten-day deadline established by the modification order, each parent is obligated to support his or her child during the child’s minority and is liable to any other person, including the other parent, who provides necessities for that child.

In re L.L., 341 S.W.3d 22 (Tex.App.—San Antonio 2010, no pet.)

However, one year later the San Antonio Court of Appeals reached an opposite result. When the father in L.L. submitted receipts for his child’s oral surgery two months after the deadline specified in the final order, the appellate court determined the trial court’s denial of father’s request for reimbursement for the surgery was not an abuse of discretion because father failed to provide timely notice of the expense as required by the decree.

Father argued that mother was still responsible for reimbursement because she had a duty to support the children regardless of whether he provided notice pursuant to the decree, relying on In re A.C.B. (discussed above). The L.L. court disagreed, noting that because the trial court chose to enforce the notice requirement contained in the decree, the trial court never acted in an arbitrary manner or failed to follow guiding principles.

Herzfeld v. Herzfeld, 05-10-01298-CV, 2012 WL 6061772 (Tex. App.—Dallas Dec. 6, 2012, no. pet. h.) (NOT REPORTED IN S.W.3d (2012))

The Herzfeld court agreed with the San Antonio Court of Appeals in holding a trial court did not abuse its discretion in denying mother’s request for medical expense reimbursement. While there was evidence from mother that the children saw a psychologist, there was no evidence as to the number of appointments nor was there any definitive testimony regarding the amount owed to the doctor.

Mother testified from memory that both of the children saw a psychologist an average of twice a month, presumably every month from the time of the separation until they turned eighteen. She sought $200 per month pre-divorce and $100 a month post-divorce.

However, there was no evidence Wife timely notified Husband of the payments made and no evidence of the dates on which they were made. Furthermore, the trial court found evidence as to an actual amount was “speculative” because there were no records of visits by date or by child. Given the absence of any other proof to corroborate Wife’s testimony regarding the number of children’s visits, when they occurred, or the cost of each visit, the court upheld the trial court’s decision in concluding the amount was speculative.

CONCLUSION

The classic (and often frustrating) response to many legal questions is “it depends.” It appears that answer also applies here. The one consistency in all three of the above cases is each appellate court’s reluctance to overturn the lower court’s ruling. The trial court’s decision hinges on accepting the “each parent is obligated to support his or her child” argument versus the “strict adherence to the deadline” stance. Just to be on the safe side, one should always submit any health care bills or receipts to the other parent before the deadline passes.

What Would My Texas Child Support Be?

Ever wonder how much you would pay in child support in Texas?  The Texas Office of the Attorney General has on online child support calculator that gets pretty close to figuring out what your child support obligation would be in Texas.  The actual number may vary, but this will give you a good idea -

LINK TO TEXAS CHILD SUPPORT CALCULATOR

Want to Change Child Support? Know the A, B, C’s…

Changing a child support payment (whether your’s or your ex’s) is certainly possible, just make sure that all the bases are covered.  Let’s look at the first group of steps needed, which can be found in Texas Family Code section 156.401(a).

  1. A “material and substantial change in circumstances” is needed.  Here, we need it to be a financial change (either earning power or monetary need).
  2. Those circumstances must relate to the child or a person affected by the order.
  3. The change in circumstance must have occurred after the signing of the order.

With the above set of facts, changing that child support payment becomes possible.  At the hearing, the above must be shown.  Simple testimony is not always enough.  The best way would be to show tax returns or pay stubs showing income at the time of the signing of the order, then current tax returns or pay stubs.

For an interesting case showing this process, look at In the Interest of C.H.C. by clicking the name of the case.

Challenging Child Support by Challenging Paternity

When parents divorce, it is only proper that the parents still support their children.  In the case of women, there are very few circumstances where there is a question as to whether she is the biological Mother.  However, men don’t have it that easy, and some men accept children, and the obligation to support them, only to find out later that the child is not their offspring.

How to challenge a child support order when the child is not yours?

Thanks to a new law, men can challenge their child support order by challenging the biological relationship with the child (think DNA testing).  There are some restrictions.

For all orders prior September 1, 2011, the man must have believed at the time of the order or signing of the acknowledgment of paternity that he was the father due to misrepresentations made to him.  If the order was prior September 1, 2011, he has until September 1, 2012, to challenge the order in a court of law.

For orders after September 1, 2011, the man must have believed at the time of the order that his was the father due to misrepresentations made to him and must file to terminate the relationship within one year of finding facts that indicate he is not the biological father.

Under either route, timing is important.  If you wait too long to challenge the order, you waive the objection.

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